Bachelor of Arts degree in Biochemistry

Bachelor of Arts degree in Biochemistry

Students who earn the B.A. with a major in biochemistry will be appropriately competent in the following areas:
  • atomic and molecular structure and chemical bonding
  • the language of chemistry: verbal, written, numerical, and graphical presentation of chemical concepts
  • equilibria and stoichiometry
  • periodic relationships
  • thermochemistry
  • physical measurements of chemical systems
  • chemistry laboratory skills, including data organization and analysis
  • recognition, structure, and reactivity of the major organic functional groups
  • experimental synthesis and characterization of organic compounds by physical and instrumental methods
  • in-depth study of biological molecules and metabolism
  • techniques of biotechnology

Degree requirements

  • General Chemistry  1101, 1102 - 8 semester hours
  • Organic Chemistry 2201, 2202 - 8 semester hours
  • Biophysical Chemistry 3311 - 4 semester hours
  • Junior Seminar, Chemistry 3371 - 2 semester hours
  • Biochemistry, Chemistry 4421, 4422 - 8 semester hours
  • Senior Seminar, Chemistry 4471 - 2 semester hours
  • Math 1114 or 1121 - 3 semester hours
  • Physics 1101, 1102 - 8 semester hours
  • Suggested but not required Biology - 8 semester hours

The scheduling for the B.A. degree in biochemistry is flexible.  The following is a proposed schedule to meet the requirements for the degree.  This degree provides a flexible yet strong program for the pre-health professional requirements

  Fall Spring
First Year   MATH 1121 or MATH 1114
Second Year CHEM 1101 CHEM 1102
Third Year CHEM 2201 CHEM 2202
  PHYS  1101 PHYS  1102
    CHEM 3371
Fourth Year CHEM 4421 CHEM 4422
  CHEM 3311 CHEM 4471

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Career Information:

Employment sectors with the greatest number of chemistry employees were: 

  1. Industry (including chemical and pharmaceutical companies)
  2. Academic institutions
  3. Government laboratories

Agriculture, manufacturing, real estate, educational services, retail trade and healthcare contributed another five million jobs to the U.S. economy through their dependence on chemistry products.